REFERENCES

         -            1903 'Notes on a Field Meeting to Chibburn' Proceedings of the Society of Antiquares of Newcastle upon Tyne 3rd series, number 1, 86-87

Fincham, H W 1922 'Notes on a Field Meeting to Chibburn, 28th June 1920' Proceeding of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne 3rd series, number 10, 261-263

Hodgson, J Crawford 1896 'Chibburn and the Knights Hospitallers in Northumberland' Archaeologia Aeliana ​2nd series, number 17, 263-280

Honeyman, H L 1942 '.......' Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne 192

Larking, L B and Kemble, J M 1857 The Knights Hospitallers in England  Camden Society, 52-53

Rushton, S 1996 'Recent Work at Low Chibburn' Archaeology in Northumberland 1995-1996,​ 6-7

Ryder, P F 1995a Some Architectural Features at Low Chibburn, Northumberland  unpublished report for Northumberland County Council

Ryder, P F 1995b Architectural Fragments at Low Chibburn, Northumberland  unpublished report for Northumberland County Council

Wilson, F R 1861 'Chibburn Preceptory' Archaeologia Aeliana 2nd series, number 5, 113-118

Woodman, W 1860 '........' Archaeological Journal number 17, 35-37



​Glass groove and masons' mark

During Ryder's study of the architectural fragments a number were identified that included glass grooves and one exhibited a masons' in the form of a 'W' or 'V'. An identical mark can be seen in the east jamb of the eastern most window of the chapel.

The house remained lived in until the 1940s and illustrations show that the chapel was still partly roofed in 1853. Eight years later when Wilson visited the roof had gone but the chapel walls still stood to their full height to the end of the century.



Low Chibburn in 1895



​The north-east corner of the Tudor house

None of the other buildings at Low Chibburn can be definitely attributed to the Hospitallers and  the remains other than the chapel belong to the post-dissolution development of the site. A possible exception may be provided by the lower levels of the north-east corner of the Tudor house. The stonework here is of a  different character to that of the rest of the house and may be compared with the  stonework of the chapel. Accordingly, it is possible that this represents a last surviving fragment of the manerium incorporated in the later house. Whether the manerium was a conventional manor house, or a tower house as suggested by a reconstruction drawing displayed at the site, cannot now be established but the fragment referred to suggests a fairly massive construction.

LOW CHIBBURN PRECEPTORY, archaeology.3